Ruled Nation. Failed Home.

David ruled a nation but failed to care for his home. His daughter was raped. His son was murdered. The murderous son tried to overthrow David. And this was all between three of his children in his own home.

Service to THE HOUSE (THE CHURCH) does not excuse negligence in your house.

Absalom was the third son of King David and was identified as the most handsome man in the kingdom (1). He was a great favorite of his father, and of the people. His charming manners, personal beauty, insinuating ways, love of pomp, and royal pretensions, captivated the hearts of the people from the beginning. He lived in great style, drove in a magnificent chariot, and had fifty men run before him. However, he had a number of issues that were never dealt with.

Tamar his biological sister, whom he shared both parents with, was raped by her half-brother, and David’s eldest son, Amnon. Absalom was furious and for two years he plotted against Amnon. Absalom planned a party. He invited all of the king’s sons to the party. Amnon gets drunk and in his drunken state Absalom sends his servants to kill Amnon, which they do (2). Absalom flees the kingdom and was gone for three years.
During this time David is mad. However, David is not dealing with neither of these situations.

laavesh hingorani

David is the king. He can usher in the presence of God through song, dance, praise, and worship. He can lead armies, overthrow kingdoms, and bring down giants. But, in all of this he could not discipline or chastise Amnon for sexually assaulting his daughter and raping her. Out of David’s negligence, Absalom decides to take matters into his own hands.

When justice does not come from those who have the responsibility to execute justice, someone else will take matters into their own hands.

Absalom took matters into his own hands. Absalom was not considering the grace, mercy, and forgiveness of God. Absalom was only concerned about avenging his sister and he does.

He avenges his sister, goes on the run, and three years later he is restored back to the kingdom (3). There is no mention of communication, conversation, or even repercussions for the murder. He’s just back. This is not a prodigal son moment (4). This is murder.

Absalom is back. Maybe Absalom repented. Maybe he sought the Lord for forgiveness. Maybe he and the Lord worked through this, and now, he is back as a changed man.

Nope!

Absalom starts campaigning against his father for his father’s seat and throne as king (5). The campaigning becomes so intense and deep that David goes into hiding and Absalom sits in his father’s seat. For four years Absalom sat in his father’s seat and played king, while trying to figure out how to kill his father.

What would have happened if, at any point, David would have sat down with his family, spent time with them, talked with them, engaged them about life, Faith, and their walk with God? What would have happened if David would have dealt with the rape and/or the murder?

Maybe he would have had two other sons alive and a daughter who would not have been raped by her brother. Maybe he would have never had to go into hiding.

Does David’s role as king excuse him from the failures of being a father? Does his anointing excuse him from dealing with issues within his home?

Do not allow your family to fall prey and victim to your gifts, talents, and abilities while outsiders and onlookers become victors from them. Outsiders and onlookers want the gifts. Your family want the person. Outsiders and onlookers want what you can do. Your family wants who you are. Outsiders and onlookers will leave you once they have consumed you. Your family will love you because they are in covenant with you.

1. 2 Samuel 14:25
2. 2 Samuel 13
3. 2 Samuel 13-14
4. Luke 15:11-32
5. 2 Samuel 15

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s